Get Compensated for Up To £100,000 for Road Traffic Accident 

The average road traffic accident (RTA) injury compensation payout in the UK was £25K in 2022.

Did a road traffic accident leave you anxious and traumatised? And it wasn’t even your fault? Our expert witnesses deliver RTA assessments and court reports, helping you get compensated for non-fault injuries in the UK.

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Badly disabled, brain damage with little or no response. Includes people in a vegetative state in need of full-time nursing. At the lower end, cases result in minimally conscious states with less than 15 years of life expectancy.

Injuries leading to complete blindness, or blinded in one eye and/ or severely reduced vision in another.

Injury leading to complete deafness. If injured as a child, higher compensation may apply if there is a loss of speech.

Facial disfigurement, very serious multiple fractures to the jaw, (resulting in eating restrictions and risk of arthritis in the joints) chronic tooth pain, or scarring, amounts depending on how seriously affected. Men could receive less for facial disfigurement than women with the same injury. Typically teens to early 30s, those psychologically damaged receive higher awards.

Neck injuries involving serious fractures, damage to discs and partial paraplegia. Cases also include severe soft tissue damage, leading to chronic pain conditions and significant disability of a permanent nature.

Back injury usually requires surgery such as damaged spinal cord leading to partial paralysis, loss of bowel/bladder function and psychological
issues. Cases may include nerve root damage, disc lesions, fractures, impaired agility, personality change and arthritis.

Injuries associated with damages to the neck and the brachial plexus resulting in significant disability.

Severe hip or pelvis fractures that have led to bowel damage or have required a spinal fusion. Amounts depend on long-term effects (e.g. child-birth complications) and likelihood of more surgery. Injuries include minor fractures resulting in hip replacement.

Amputation of one or both arms. Amount awarded depends on where amputation is, age and the effect the operation has on life and whether there are phantom pains.

Amounts could apply if injury has required surgery or resulted in severe disability.

When a person has had one/both hands amputated, or had their hand rendered almost useless by amputation of more than one finger. Also cases where several fingers have been amputated but re-joined, leaving it clawed, clumsy and unsightly.

Wrist injuries resulting in complete loss of function and significant permanent disability.

One or more fingers completely amputated. Amount depends on which finger(s) had to be removed and the level of disability the person suffers as a result. This includes total and partial loss of index finger and fractures of the index finger.

Injuries include having part or all of your thumb amputated, suffering nerve damage, fractures, or losing your ability to grip properly. May also involve the insertion of wire.

Injuries would usually include either a single or double amputation (the higher awards reserved for above the knee amputations), extensive degloving including bone grafting, and in most cases a permanent future mobility restriction.

Joint injury that has resulted in serious disability, constant pain or muscle wastage. Compensation amounts would depend on whether you are likely to need surgery in the future and the effects your injury will have on your life.

Severe ankle injury leading to serious deformity, disability or even the possibility of amputation in the long-term.

Muscles have been severed and this has led to restricted ankle movement. Injuries include a limp and residual scarring, and where further improvement is unlikely.

Amputation of one or both feet, including traumatic amputation of the forefoot where there was a significant risk of the need for full amputation.

Amputation of all of your toes or your big toe. Amount depends on whether you lost your toe(s) in an incident or had them surgically removed. Severe crush injuries leading to amputation of one or two toes, but not the big toe.

In these cases, PTSD will prevent the injured person from working at all or at least from functioning at anything approaching the pre-trauma level.

In these cases the injured person will have marked problems with respect to their ability to cope with life, education and work and relationships with family and friends. The prognosis will be very poor.

A number of noticeable laceration scars or single disfiguring scars.

Serious physical symptoms or a significant change to your intellect or personality. It could cause substantial dependence on others, paralysis and reduced life expectancy.

Injuries leading to the loss of an eye, lost sight in one eye or suffering some but not total visual impairment.

Loss of total hearing in one ear, amounts dependent on additional symptoms such as dizziness and tinnitus.

Facial fractures such as broken jaw or nose. Amounts dependent on severity. Also apply to broken, damaged or lost teeth.

Serious injuries may include fractures to the humerus, fractures to the clavicle and rotator cuff tears leading to surgery.

Arm injury not resulting in amputation, but has a serious effect on ability to use arm(s) resulting in disability.

Elbow injuries that did not require surgery or lead to a disability, but has resulted in restricted movement.

Injuries include broken wrist or soft tissue damage, resulting in some permanent disability.

The effects are still likely to cause significant disability for the foreseeable future, however, there is room for some recovery with professional help.

In these cases, the person will suffer with significant issues, but the prognosis will be much more optimistic.

Symptoms can range from minor personality change, depression, poor concentration, and a small risk of epilepsy. At the top end of the bracket, symptoms could result in permanent vegetative state, high risk of epilepsy and some intellectual deficit.

Compensation amounts apply for those suffering from partial hearing loss to mild or severe tinnitus.

Injuries such as fractures or dislocations which may result in spinal fusion. Cases may include disc lesion, cervical spondylosis, serious limitation of movement, permanent recurring pain. Also injuries which have accelerated a pre-existing condition.

Compression or crushed fracture of the lumbar spine causing a large risk of osteoarthritis and constant pain. May include spinal fusion, prolapsed disc requiring surgery and prolonged acceleration or exacerbation of a pre-existing back condition.

Injuries that require a hip operation / replacement (or may lead to you requiring one in the future), but are unlikely to suffer from any serious disability as a result.

If there is a degree of disability for a period of time (such as a broken arm) but are expected to make a complete (or almost complete) recovery.

The majority of elbow injuries fall under this category. These amounts apply to injuries like tennis elbow, deep cuts or simple fractures that don’t lead to permanent damage.

Injuries like deep cuts and soft tissue damage that have resulted in impaired function of the hand that may require surgery. At the bottom end of the scale, this will cover crush injuries, penetrating wounds and any permanent but non-intrusive symptoms.

Injuries including minor undisplaced fractures and an uncomplicated Colles fracture requiring the use of plasters, but recovery expected between 12 months and 2 years.

At the top end of the scale, amputation or loss of the little finger. On the lower end, If you have suffered from a broken finger but have had a complete (or almost complete) recovery.

Injuries including fractures, recovering within six months and at the higher end of the scale, damage to tendons or nerves, causing impairment of sensation. At the higher end of the scale, cosmetic deformity of the thumb.

Injuries including a broken leg, multiple fractures or crushing injuries, generally to one leg. Compound fractures or ligament injuries resulting in instability with a near-certainty of arthritis . Minor fractures with an incomplete recovery or serious soft tissue injury.

Serious damage to the kneecap, ligaments or muscles, resulting in some disability with continued pain and discomfort. Also included are injuries involving dislocation, torn meniscus or acceleration type injuries over a prolonged period of years.

Ankle injury requiring operation/plaster. Amount depends on if injury affects ability to work and if you need special footwear. Fractures, ligamentous tears, which lead to less serious disabilities when walking/standing, risk of future osteoarthritis.

Cases involving partial rupture or significant injury to the tendon. At the top end of the scale, injuries involving disability and permanent scarring.

Fractures of both heels with restriction on mobility, including degloving, heel fusion and deformity. At the bottom end of the scale, injuries will include metatarsal fractures, resulting in permanent deformity and continuing symptoms.

Injuries include multiple fractures or crush injury to two or more toes including the big toe. At the top end of the scale, there will be some permanent disability, and there will have been a number of unsuccessful operations.

The injured person will have largely recovered and any continuing effects will not be grossly disabling.

While the person may have suffered with various issues, marked improvements will have been made and the prognosis will be good.

At the top end of the scale, the injured person will have largely recovered, and any continuing effects will not be grossly disabling. At the bottom end of the scale, virtually a full recovery will be made within 2 years.

In these cases, if there has been any brain damage, there is likely to have been a recovery within a few weeks. Awards can be influenced by the presence or absence of headaches.

Minor injuries, such as being struck in the eye, explosion to fumes, or being splashed by liquids. In the majority of cases, recovery is within a few weeks.

Very slight or occasional tinnitus, possible NIHL (Noise Induced Hearing Loss).

Facial injury that didn’t include broken bones and left only very light or no scarring. Cases may include loss or damage to two front teeth or less,
simple fractures of the jaw and nose with full recovery.

Soft tissue or whiplash injury but with recovery within three months to two years of incident. Amounts vary on severity of injury, level of pain and effect on restriction of ability to take part in your usual activities.

Soft tissue injuries, including less serious strains and sprains and disc prolapses. Full recovery takes place between 3 months and 5 years.

Suffered pain from a soft tissue injury lasting 3 months to less than 2 years, but have eventually had a full recovery.

Minor soft tissue injuries with complete recovery, where there is little or nor residual disability within 2 years.

Simple fractures of the forearm. Awards at the top end of the scale will include longer than usual recovery periods and other extenuating factors.

Soft tissue injuries with a recovery time of 6 months or less. Less serious injuries include crush injuries and lacerations.

Injuries such as fractured fingers that have healed fully within 12 months. At the bottom end of the scale, there will be minor scarring.

These injuries may have caused severe pain for a short time, but will have resolved completely within 3 months.

Injuries that resolve within a few months, including soft tissue injuries, cuts, bruising, and contusions. At the top end of the scale, simple fractures of the femur, tibia and fibula.

Injuries involving twisting, lacerations or bruising, where there is continuous aching or discomfort. At the bottom end of the scale, soft tissue injuries resolve in a few months.

Minor or undisplaced fractures, sprains and ligamentous injuries where there is an element of scarring. At the bottom end of the scale, injuries where recovery is complete without scarring and within a year.

Tendon damage to the ankle, resulting in minor instability. At the top end of the scale, cases may involve scarring.

Injuries include ruptured ligaments, puncture wounds where symptoms include a permanent limp, pain or aching, minor fractures, lacerations or contusions from which a complete recovery has been made within 2 years.

Injuries include one or more broken toes Compensation amounts will depend on how quickly you recover and whether or not you will suffer long-term symptoms. Injuries at the bottom end of the scale will have resolved completely within a short space of time.

A virtually full recovery will have been made within one to two years and only minor symptoms will persist

The level of the award will take into consideration the length of the period of disability and the extent to which daily activities and sleep were affected.

A single noticeable scar, or several superficial scars of leg, arm or hand, with some minor cosmetic deficit.

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Get Compensated for Up To £100,000 for Road Traffic Accident 

The average road traffic accident (RTA) injury compensation payout in the UK was £25K in 2022.

You are legally entitled to filing a slip trip or fall claim when an accident occurs due to someone else’s negligence or breach of duty. Concise Medico is your trusted partner in the UK for securing the rightful compensation for your pain, suffering and losses.

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  • Accessible slip fall or trip claim consultations for claimants

  • Ensuring no advance charges or payments are made by you

  • Proven success of slip trip or fall accident claims in the UK

  • Careful case analysis ensures you get rightfully compensated

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Badly disabled, brain damage with little or no response. Includes people in a vegetative state in need of full-time nursing. At the lower end, cases result in minimally conscious states with less than 15 years of life expectancy.

Injuries leading to complete blindness, or blinded in one eye and/ or severely reduced vision in another.

Injury leading to complete deafness. If injured as a child, higher compensation may apply if there is a loss of speech.

Facial disfigurement, very serious multiple fractures to the jaw, (resulting in eating restrictions and risk of arthritis in the joints) chronic tooth pain, or scarring, amounts depending on how seriously affected. Men could receive less for facial disfigurement than women with the same injury. Typically teens to early 30s, those psychologically damaged receive higher awards.

Neck injuries involving serious fractures, damage to discs and partial paraplegia. Cases also include severe soft tissue damage, leading to chronic pain conditions and significant disability of a permanent nature.

Back injury usually requires surgery such as damaged spinal cord leading to partial paralysis, loss of bowel/bladder function and psychological
issues. Cases may include nerve root damage, disc lesions, fractures, impaired agility, personality change and arthritis.

Injuries associated with damages to the neck and the brachial plexus resulting in significant disability.

Severe hip or pelvis fractures that have led to bowel damage or have required a spinal fusion. Amounts depend on long-term effects (e.g. child-birth complications) and likelihood of more surgery. Injuries include minor fractures resulting in hip replacement.

Amputation of one or both arms. Amount awarded depends on where amputation is, age and the effect the operation has on life and whether there are phantom pains.

Amounts could apply if injury has required surgery or resulted in severe disability.

When a person has had one/both hands amputated, or had their hand rendered almost useless by amputation of more than one finger. Also cases where several fingers have been amputated but re-joined, leaving it clawed, clumsy and unsightly.

Wrist injuries resulting in complete loss of function and significant permanent disability.

One or more fingers completely amputated. Amount depends on which finger(s) had to be removed and the level of disability the person suffers as a result. This includes total and partial loss of index finger and fractures of the index finger.

Injuries include having part or all of your thumb amputated, suffering nerve damage, fractures, or losing your ability to grip properly. May also involve the insertion of wire.

Injuries would usually include either a single or double amputation (the higher awards reserved for above the knee amputations), extensive degloving including bone grafting, and in most cases a permanent future mobility restriction.

Joint injury that has resulted in serious disability, constant pain or muscle wastage. Compensation amounts would depend on whether you are likely to need surgery in the future and the effects your injury will have on your life.

Severe ankle injury leading to serious deformity, disability or even the possibility of amputation in the long-term.

Muscles have been severed and this has led to restricted ankle movement. Injuries include a limp and residual scarring, and where further improvement is unlikely.

Amputation of one or both feet, including traumatic amputation of the forefoot where there was a significant risk of the need for full amputation.

Amputation of all of your toes or your big toe. Amount depends on whether you lost your toe(s) in an incident or had them surgically removed. Severe crush injuries leading to amputation of one or two toes, but not the big toe.

In these cases, PTSD will prevent the injured person from working at all or at least from functioning at anything approaching the pre-trauma level.

In these cases the injured person will have marked problems with respect to their ability to cope with life, education and work and relationships with family and friends. The prognosis will be very poor.

A number of noticeable laceration scars or single disfiguring scars.

Serious physical symptoms or a significant change to your intellect or personality. It could cause substantial dependence on others, paralysis and reduced life expectancy.

Injuries leading to the loss of an eye, lost sight in one eye or suffering some but not total visual impairment.

Loss of total hearing in one ear, amounts dependent on additional symptoms such as dizziness and tinnitus.

Facial fractures such as broken jaw or nose. Amounts dependent on severity. Also apply to broken, damaged or lost teeth.

Serious injuries may include fractures to the humerus, fractures to the clavicle and rotator cuff tears leading to surgery.

Arm injury not resulting in amputation, but has a serious effect on ability to use arm(s) resulting in disability.

Elbow injuries that did not require surgery or lead to a disability, but has resulted in restricted movement.

Injuries include broken wrist or soft tissue damage, resulting in some permanent disability.

The effects are still likely to cause significant disability for the foreseeable future, however, there is room for some recovery with professional help.

In these cases, the person will suffer with significant issues, but the prognosis will be much more optimistic.

Symptoms can range from minor personality change, depression, poor concentration, and a small risk of epilepsy. At the top end of the bracket, symptoms could result in permanent vegetative state, high risk of epilepsy and some intellectual deficit.

Compensation amounts apply for those suffering from partial hearing loss to mild or severe tinnitus.

Injuries such as fractures or dislocations which may result in spinal fusion. Cases may include disc lesion, cervical spondylosis, serious limitation of movement, permanent recurring pain. Also injuries which have accelerated a pre-existing condition.

Compression or crushed fracture of the lumbar spine causing a large risk of osteoarthritis and constant pain. May include spinal fusion, prolapsed disc requiring surgery and prolonged acceleration or exacerbation of a pre-existing back condition.

Injuries that require a hip operation / replacement (or may lead to you requiring one in the future), but are unlikely to suffer from any serious disability as a result.

If there is a degree of disability for a period of time (such as a broken arm) but are expected to make a complete (or almost complete) recovery.

The majority of elbow injuries fall under this category. These amounts apply to injuries like tennis elbow, deep cuts or simple fractures that don’t lead to permanent damage.

Injuries like deep cuts and soft tissue damage that have resulted in impaired function of the hand that may require surgery. At the bottom end of the scale, this will cover crush injuries, penetrating wounds and any permanent but non-intrusive symptoms.

Injuries including minor undisplaced fractures and an uncomplicated Colles fracture requiring the use of plasters, but recovery expected between 12 months and 2 years.

At the top end of the scale, amputation or loss of the little finger. On the lower end, If you have suffered from a broken finger but have had a complete (or almost complete) recovery.

Injuries including fractures, recovering within six months and at the higher end of the scale, damage to tendons or nerves, causing impairment of sensation. At the higher end of the scale, cosmetic deformity of the thumb.

Injuries including a broken leg, multiple fractures or crushing injuries, generally to one leg. Compound fractures or ligament injuries resulting in instability with a near-certainty of arthritis . Minor fractures with an incomplete recovery or serious soft tissue injury.

Serious damage to the kneecap, ligaments or muscles, resulting in some disability with continued pain and discomfort. Also included are injuries involving dislocation, torn meniscus or acceleration type injuries over a prolonged period of years.

Ankle injury requiring operation/plaster. Amount depends on if injury affects ability to work and if you need special footwear. Fractures, ligamentous tears, which lead to less serious disabilities when walking/standing, risk of future osteoarthritis.

Cases involving partial rupture or significant injury to the tendon. At the top end of the scale, injuries involving disability and permanent scarring.

Fractures of both heels with restriction on mobility, including degloving, heel fusion and deformity. At the bottom end of the scale, injuries will include metatarsal fractures, resulting in permanent deformity and continuing symptoms.

Injuries include multiple fractures or crush injury to two or more toes including the big toe. At the top end of the scale, there will be some permanent disability, and there will have been a number of unsuccessful operations.

The injured person will have largely recovered and any continuing effects will not be grossly disabling.

While the person may have suffered with various issues, marked improvements will have been made and the prognosis will be good.

At the top end of the scale, the injured person will have largely recovered, and any continuing effects will not be grossly disabling. At the bottom end of the scale, virtually a full recovery will be made within 2 years.

In these cases, if there has been any brain damage, there is likely to have been a recovery within a few weeks. Awards can be influenced by the presence or absence of headaches.

Minor injuries, such as being struck in the eye, explosion to fumes, or being splashed by liquids. In the majority of cases, recovery is within a few weeks.

Very slight or occasional tinnitus, possible NIHL (Noise Induced Hearing Loss).

Facial injury that didn’t include broken bones and left only very light or no scarring. Cases may include loss or damage to two front teeth or less,
simple fractures of the jaw and nose with full recovery.

Soft tissue or whiplash injury but with recovery within three months to two years of incident. Amounts vary on severity of injury, level of pain and effect on restriction of ability to take part in your usual activities.

Soft tissue injuries, including less serious strains and sprains and disc prolapses. Full recovery takes place between 3 months and 5 years.

Suffered pain from a soft tissue injury lasting 3 months to less than 2 years, but have eventually had a full recovery.

Minor soft tissue injuries with complete recovery, where there is little or nor residual disability within 2 years.

Simple fractures of the forearm. Awards at the top end of the scale will include longer than usual recovery periods and other extenuating factors.

Soft tissue injuries with a recovery time of 6 months or less. Less serious injuries include crush injuries and lacerations.

Injuries such as fractured fingers that have healed fully within 12 months. At the bottom end of the scale, there will be minor scarring.

These injuries may have caused severe pain for a short time, but will have resolved completely within 3 months.

Injuries that resolve within a few months, including soft tissue injuries, cuts, bruising, and contusions. At the top end of the scale, simple fractures of the femur, tibia and fibula.

Injuries involving twisting, lacerations or bruising, where there is continuous aching or discomfort. At the bottom end of the scale, soft tissue injuries resolve in a few months.

Minor or undisplaced fractures, sprains and ligamentous injuries where there is an element of scarring. At the bottom end of the scale, injuries where recovery is complete without scarring and within a year.

Tendon damage to the ankle, resulting in minor instability. At the top end of the scale, cases may involve scarring.

Injuries include ruptured ligaments, puncture wounds where symptoms include a permanent limp, pain or aching, minor fractures, lacerations or contusions from which a complete recovery has been made within 2 years.

Injuries include one or more broken toes Compensation amounts will depend on how quickly you recover and whether or not you will suffer long-term symptoms. Injuries at the bottom end of the scale will have resolved completely within a short space of time.

A virtually full recovery will have been made within one to two years and only minor symptoms will persist

The level of the award will take into consideration the length of the period of disability and the extent to which daily activities and sleep were affected.

A single noticeable scar, or several superficial scars of leg, arm or hand, with some minor cosmetic deficit.

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Eligibility Criteria for Injury Compensation

Road Traffic Accidents (Tariff Injuries) Road Traffic Accidents (Non-Tariff Injuries)
Defining Injuries RTA Injuries that fall within the predefined tariff range set by the Whiplash Reforms Act, 2021, in the UK.

  • Mild whiplash injury: Symptoms fully recover within 3 months
  • Moderate whiplash injury: Symptoms recover within 3 months to 2 years
  • Severe whiplash injury: Symptoms recover between 2 and 5 years
RTA Injuries that do not fall within the predefined tariff range, e.g., fractures, disabilities, bruising, and psychological harm.

  • Significant pain, suffering and loss of amenity (PSLA)
  • Longer recovery periods, ongoing symptoms or disability
  • Significant limitations on daily activities and impact on future employment
Eligibility Criteria Claimants must initiate the claim within 3 years of the RTA accident following the predefined criteria through Official Injury Claim Portal in the UK. Claimants with injuries that require further psychological assessment and court negotiation must get legal assistance and initiate their road traffic accident and injury claims within 3 years of the accident.
Accidents/ Incidents The events that may lead to tariff RTA injuries in the UK include the following: 

  • Rear-end collisions 
  • Car accidents at intersections 
  • Minor accidents at low speeds 
  • Bumper-to-bumper traffic accidents
  • Parking lot collisions 
  • Accidents caused by sudden braking
  • Accidents during stop-and-go traffic
  • Accidents involving public transportation
  • Accidents caused by distracted driving
  • Accidents caused by reckless driving
The events that may lead to non-tariff RTA injuries in the UK include the following: 

  • Slip, trip and fall accidents
  • Living in a disrepair property
  • Sports-related injuries and accidents 
  • Injuries sustained in occupational settings
  • Experiencing medical negligence
  • Accidents in public spaces due to poor maintenance 
  • Product liability incidents (e.g., faulty electronics)
  • Accidents on-site due to inadequate safety measures
  • Accidents during leisure and recreational activities
  • Sexual and physical assaults and attacks
Evidence Needed The following types of evidence are required to pursue your claim through the Official Injury Portal:

Medical evidence, such as RTA medical reports, diagnoses and treatment records

Proof of the road traffic accident, including accident reports, police reports, CCTV recordings or witness statements.

Additional documents, including HSE reports, a diary or a logbook, etc

Legal help is required for gathering evidence in the case of non-tariff RTA injuries in the UK:

  • Medical evidence and reports for RTA
  • The extent of vehicle damage in RTA
  • Photographs and witness statements
  • RTA Expert court reports and assessments
  • Health and Safety Executive Reports

Additional evidence to support the severity and impact of the injury, including treatment records, expert testimony in the court and associated expenses.

Exemptions Motorcyclists, cyclists, riders (driver or passenger), wheelchair users, mobility scooter users, and pedestrians are not included in the tariff system. Exemptions for road traffic accidents occurring outside the scope of the Whiplash Reforms Act 2021, i.e., road traffic accidents involving uninsured or untraceable drivers.
Compensation Awards Fixed compensation amounts are awarded based on the severity of the injury and the duration of symptoms through the Official Injury Claim Portal.

  • Mild whiplash injuries with full recovery within 3 months – £1,000
  • Moderate whiplash injuries with recovery within 3 to 24 months – £2,000
  • Severe whiplash injuries with recovery between 2 and 5 years – £3,725
These injuries require careful assessments and negotiation based on the individual circumstances and impact of the injury; hence, the court determines the compensation amounts.

  • The severity of your RTA injuries (e.g., lifelong or partial disabilities)
  • Impact of injuries on your life (e.g., loss of future earning capacity)
  • The cost of any treatment (e.g., rehabilitation or therapy)
Legal Aid Claimants can use legal advice to understand the process and initiate their claims through the Official Injury Claim Portal in the UK. In non-tariff RTA injury compensation cases, legal assistance is mandatory. Legal representatives help gather evidence, assess the injury’s impact and ensure fair compensation.

Compensation for non-tariff RTA psychological injuries

If you are struggling with anxiety and depression after being involved in a road traffic accident that was not your fault – you no longer have to suffer! You can claim compensation for the following two categories as defined by the Judicial College Guidelines:

Claim the maximum compensation amounts for road traffic accidents

Start your claim today and get closer to the compensation you deserve. Once you contact us, our psychology experts will establish the following to strengthen your case for getting the maximum compensation in the UK:

  • General psychiatric damages include but are not limited to depression, stress, anxiety, pre-travel/ travel anxiety, distress, embarrassment, panic attacks and personality disorders.

  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) occurs when the victim develops psychological trauma after a traumatic event. Its symptoms include hyperarousal, flashbacks and intrusive thoughts.

Whether you were the driver, passenger, pedestrian, motorcyclist or secondary victim in a road traffic accident, you can claim psychological injury compensation as part of physical injury compensation.

  • Determine eligibility and gather evidence.

  • Establish the causation of your RTA injury

  • Connection of your injury with your accident

  • Determine eligibility and gather evidence.

  • The impact of injury on the quality of your life

  • The prognosis and future consequences

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Frequently asked questions

Tariff RTA injuries refer to whiplash injuries that fall within the predefined compensation tariff set by the Whiplash Reforms Act 2021. Non-tariff injuries, on the other hand, are injuries that do not fit within the predefined tariff range and require further physical and/ or psychological assessment to understand the severity and impact of the injury to ensure fair compensation.

Motorcyclists, cyclists, wheelchair/ mobility scooter users and pedestrians are exempted from the tariff system. Additionally, exemptions may be granted in specific circumstances, such as accidents involving uninsured or untraced drivers or accidents occurring outside the scope of the Whiplash Reforms Act.

If you are unsure whether your injury falls under the category of tariff or non-tariff, we recommend you contact us. Alternatively, you can also schedule a call back via (01282) 786 185 or drop an email at info@concisemedico.co.uk today!

Our experts will assess the details of your injury, review the specific circumstances of the incident/ accident, and provide guidance based on their expertise and knowledge of the Whiplash Reforms Act.

Seeking legal assistance and representation is especially recommended for non-tariff injuries, as these injuries rely on further medical and psychological assessments and expert reports for negotiating fair compensation.

However, for tariff injuries, legal professionals will only advise and guide claimants through the process of claiming compensation via the Official Injury Portal in the UK.

As part of our initial consultation, we’ll review any proof and evidence you’ve managed to obtain so far. Our personal injury experts in the UK will help you with the following right away:

  • Determine your eligibility
  • Gather the required evidence
  • Provide legal representation

So, feel free to contact us at any time. You can also schedule a call back via (01282) 786 185 or drop an email at info@concisemedico.co.uk today!

Get Compensated for Up To
£100,000 for Road Traffic Accident and Injuries

The average RTA injury compensation payout
in the UK was £25K in 2022.

Did a road traffic accident leave you anxious and traumatised? And it wasn’t even your fault? Our expert witnesses deliver RTA assessments and court reports, helping you get compensated for non-fault injuries in the UK.

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Trusted by legal professionals nationwide

  • Complete access to 300+ live appointments

  • Nationwide appointments and online assessments

  • Access to experienced APIL registered psychologists

  • 100% CPR-compliant medical reports in just 15 days

  • Expert witness testimony in personal injury proceedings

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Badly disabled, brain damage with little or no response. Includes people in a vegetative state in need of full-time nursing. At the lower end, cases result in minimally conscious states with less than 15 years of life expectancy.

Injuries leading to complete blindness, or blinded in one eye and/ or severely reduced vision in another.

Injury leading to complete deafness. If injured as a child, higher compensation may apply if there is a loss of speech.

Facial disfigurement, very serious multiple fractures to the jaw, (resulting in eating restrictions and risk of arthritis in the joints) chronic tooth pain, or scarring, amounts depending on how seriously affected. Men could receive less for facial disfigurement than women with the same injury. Typically teens to early 30s, those psychologically damaged receive higher awards.

Neck injuries involving serious fractures, damage to discs and partial paraplegia. Cases also include severe soft tissue damage, leading to chronic pain conditions and significant disability of a permanent nature.

Back injury usually requires surgery such as damaged spinal cord leading to partial paralysis, loss of bowel/bladder function and psychological
issues. Cases may include nerve root damage, disc lesions, fractures, impaired agility, personality change and arthritis.

Injuries associated with damages to the neck and the brachial plexus resulting in significant disability.

Severe hip or pelvis fractures that have led to bowel damage or have required a spinal fusion. Amounts depend on long-term effects (e.g. child-birth complications) and likelihood of more surgery. Injuries include minor fractures resulting in hip replacement.

Amputation of one or both arms. Amount awarded depends on where amputation is, age and the effect the operation has on life and whether there are phantom pains.

Amounts could apply if injury has required surgery or resulted in severe disability.

When a person has had one/both hands amputated, or had their hand rendered almost useless by amputation of more than one finger. Also cases where several fingers have been amputated but re-joined, leaving it clawed, clumsy and unsightly.

Wrist injuries resulting in complete loss of function and significant permanent disability.

One or more fingers completely amputated. Amount depends on which finger(s) had to be removed and the level of disability the person suffers as a result. This includes total and partial loss of index finger and fractures of the index finger.

Injuries include having part or all of your thumb amputated, suffering nerve damage, fractures, or losing your ability to grip properly. May also involve the insertion of wire.

Injuries would usually include either a single or double amputation (the higher awards reserved for above the knee amputations), extensive degloving including bone grafting, and in most cases a permanent future mobility restriction.

Joint injury that has resulted in serious disability, constant pain or muscle wastage. Compensation amounts would depend on whether you are likely to need surgery in the future and the effects your injury will have on your life.

Severe ankle injury leading to serious deformity, disability or even the possibility of amputation in the long-term.

Muscles have been severed and this has led to restricted ankle movement. Injuries include a limp and residual scarring, and where further improvement is unlikely.

Amputation of one or both feet, including traumatic amputation of the forefoot where there was a significant risk of the need for full amputation.

Amputation of all of your toes or your big toe. Amount depends on whether you lost your toe(s) in an incident or had them surgically removed. Severe crush injuries leading to amputation of one or two toes, but not the big toe.

In these cases, PTSD will prevent the injured person from working at all or at least from functioning at anything approaching the pre-trauma level.

In these cases the injured person will have marked problems with respect to their ability to cope with life, education and work and relationships with family and friends. The prognosis will be very poor.

A number of noticeable laceration scars or single disfiguring scars.

Serious physical symptoms or a significant change to your intellect or personality. It could cause substantial dependence on others, paralysis and reduced life expectancy.

Injuries leading to the loss of an eye, lost sight in one eye or suffering some but not total visual impairment.

Loss of total hearing in one ear, amounts dependent on additional symptoms such as dizziness and tinnitus.

Facial fractures such as broken jaw or nose. Amounts dependent on severity. Also apply to broken, damaged or lost teeth.

Serious injuries may include fractures to the humerus, fractures to the clavicle and rotator cuff tears leading to surgery.

Arm injury not resulting in amputation, but has a serious effect on ability to use arm(s) resulting in disability.

Elbow injuries that did not require surgery or lead to a disability, but has resulted in restricted movement.

Injuries include broken wrist or soft tissue damage, resulting in some permanent disability.

The effects are still likely to cause significant disability for the foreseeable future, however, there is room for some recovery with professional help.

In these cases, the person will suffer with significant issues, but the prognosis will be much more optimistic.

Symptoms can range from minor personality change, depression, poor concentration, and a small risk of epilepsy. At the top end of the bracket, symptoms could result in permanent vegetative state, high risk of epilepsy and some intellectual deficit.

Compensation amounts apply for those suffering from partial hearing loss to mild or severe tinnitus.

Injuries such as fractures or dislocations which may result in spinal fusion. Cases may include disc lesion, cervical spondylosis, serious limitation of movement, permanent recurring pain. Also injuries which have accelerated a pre-existing condition.

Compression or crushed fracture of the lumbar spine causing a large risk of osteoarthritis and constant pain. May include spinal fusion, prolapsed disc requiring surgery and prolonged acceleration or exacerbation of a pre-existing back condition.

Injuries that require a hip operation / replacement (or may lead to you requiring one in the future), but are unlikely to suffer from any serious disability as a result.

If there is a degree of disability for a period of time (such as a broken arm) but are expected to make a complete (or almost complete) recovery.

The majority of elbow injuries fall under this category. These amounts apply to injuries like tennis elbow, deep cuts or simple fractures that don’t lead to permanent damage.

Injuries like deep cuts and soft tissue damage that have resulted in impaired function of the hand that may require surgery. At the bottom end of the scale, this will cover crush injuries, penetrating wounds and any permanent but non-intrusive symptoms.

Injuries including minor undisplaced fractures and an uncomplicated Colles fracture requiring the use of plasters, but recovery expected between 12 months and 2 years.

At the top end of the scale, amputation or loss of the little finger. On the lower end, If you have suffered from a broken finger but have had a complete (or almost complete) recovery.

Injuries including fractures, recovering within six months and at the higher end of the scale, damage to tendons or nerves, causing impairment of sensation. At the higher end of the scale, cosmetic deformity of the thumb.

Injuries including a broken leg, multiple fractures or crushing injuries, generally to one leg. Compound fractures or ligament injuries resulting in instability with a near-certainty of arthritis . Minor fractures with an incomplete recovery or serious soft tissue injury.

Serious damage to the kneecap, ligaments or muscles, resulting in some disability with continued pain and discomfort. Also included are injuries involving dislocation, torn meniscus or acceleration type injuries over a prolonged period of years.

Ankle injury requiring operation/plaster. Amount depends on if injury affects ability to work and if you need special footwear. Fractures, ligamentous tears, which lead to less serious disabilities when walking/standing, risk of future osteoarthritis.

Cases involving partial rupture or significant injury to the tendon. At the top end of the scale, injuries involving disability and permanent scarring.

Fractures of both heels with restriction on mobility, including degloving, heel fusion and deformity. At the bottom end of the scale, injuries will include metatarsal fractures, resulting in permanent deformity and continuing symptoms.

Injuries include multiple fractures or crush injury to two or more toes including the big toe. At the top end of the scale, there will be some permanent disability, and there will have been a number of unsuccessful operations.

The injured person will have largely recovered and any continuing effects will not be grossly disabling.

While the person may have suffered with various issues, marked improvements will have been made and the prognosis will be good.

At the top end of the scale, the injured person will have largely recovered, and any continuing effects will not be grossly disabling. At the bottom end of the scale, virtually a full recovery will be made within 2 years.

In these cases, if there has been any brain damage, there is likely to have been a recovery within a few weeks. Awards can be influenced by the presence or absence of headaches.

Minor injuries, such as being struck in the eye, explosion to fumes, or being splashed by liquids. In the majority of cases, recovery is within a few weeks.

Very slight or occasional tinnitus, possible NIHL (Noise Induced Hearing Loss).

Facial injury that didn’t include broken bones and left only very light or no scarring. Cases may include loss or damage to two front teeth or less,
simple fractures of the jaw and nose with full recovery.

Soft tissue or whiplash injury but with recovery within three months to two years of incident. Amounts vary on severity of injury, level of pain and effect on restriction of ability to take part in your usual activities.

Soft tissue injuries, including less serious strains and sprains and disc prolapses. Full recovery takes place between 3 months and 5 years.

Suffered pain from a soft tissue injury lasting 3 months to less than 2 years, but have eventually had a full recovery.

Minor soft tissue injuries with complete recovery, where there is little or nor residual disability within 2 years.

Simple fractures of the forearm. Awards at the top end of the scale will include longer than usual recovery periods and other extenuating factors.

Soft tissue injuries with a recovery time of 6 months or less. Less serious injuries include crush injuries and lacerations.

Injuries such as fractured fingers that have healed fully within 12 months. At the bottom end of the scale, there will be minor scarring.

These injuries may have caused severe pain for a short time, but will have resolved completely within 3 months.

Injuries that resolve within a few months, including soft tissue injuries, cuts, bruising, and contusions. At the top end of the scale, simple fractures of the femur, tibia and fibula.

Injuries involving twisting, lacerations or bruising, where there is continuous aching or discomfort. At the bottom end of the scale, soft tissue injuries resolve in a few months.

Minor or undisplaced fractures, sprains and ligamentous injuries where there is an element of scarring. At the bottom end of the scale, injuries where recovery is complete without scarring and within a year.

Tendon damage to the ankle, resulting in minor instability. At the top end of the scale, cases may involve scarring.

Injuries include ruptured ligaments, puncture wounds where symptoms include a permanent limp, pain or aching, minor fractures, lacerations or contusions from which a complete recovery has been made within 2 years.

Injuries include one or more broken toes Compensation amounts will depend on how quickly you recover and whether or not you will suffer long-term symptoms. Injuries at the bottom end of the scale will have resolved completely within a short space of time.

A virtually full recovery will have been made within one to two years and only minor symptoms will persist

The level of the award will take into consideration the length of the period of disability and the extent to which daily activities and sleep were affected.

A single noticeable scar, or several superficial scars of leg, arm or hand, with some minor cosmetic deficit.

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Eligibility Criteria for Injury Compensation

Tariff Injuries Non-Tariff Injuries
Defining Injuries Injuries that fall within the predefined tariff range set by the Whiplash Reforms Act, 2021, in the UK.

  • Mild whiplash: Symptoms fully recover within 3 months
  • Moderate whiplash: Symptoms recover within 3 months to 2 years
  • Severe whiplash: Symptoms recover between 2 and 5 years
Injuries that do not fall within the predefined tariff range, e.g., fractures, disabilities, bruising, and psychological harm.

  • Significant pain, suffering and loss of amenity (PSLA)
  • Longer recovery periods, ongoing symptoms or disability
  • Significant limitations on daily activities and impact on future employment
Eligibility Criteria Claimants must initiate the claim within 3 years of the accident following the predefined criteria through Official Injury Claim Portal in the UK. Claimants with injuries that require further psychological assessment and court negotiation must get legal assistance and initiate their claims within 3 years of the accident.
Accidents/ Incidents The events that may lead to tariff injuries in the UK include the following: 

  • Rear-end collisions 
  • Car accidents at intersections 
  • Minor accidents at low speeds 
  • Bumper-to-bumper traffic accidents
  • Parking lot collisions 
  • Accidents caused by sudden braking
  • Accidents during stop-and-go traffic
  • Accidents involving public transportation
  • Accidents caused by distracted driving
  • Accidents caused by reckless driving
The events that may lead to non-tariff injuries in the UK include the following: 

  • Slip, trip and fall accidents
  • Living in a disrepair property
  • Sports-related injuries and accidents 
  • Injuries sustained in occupational settings
  • Experiencing medical negligence
  • Accidents in public spaces due to poor maintenance 
  • Product liability incidents (e.g., faulty electronics)
  • Accidents on-site due to inadequate safety measures
  • Accidents during leisure and recreational activities
  • Sexual and physical assaults and attacks
Evidence Needed The following types of evidence are required to pursue your claim through the Official Injury Portal:

Medical evidence, such as medical reports, diagnoses and treatment records

Proof of the accident, including accident reports, police reports, CCTV recordings or witness statements.

Additional documents, including HSE reports, a diary or a logbook, etc

Legal help is required for gathering evidence in the case of non-tariff injuries in the UK:

  • Medical evidence and reports
  • The extent of vehicle damage
  • Photographs and witness statements
  • Expert court reports and assessments
  • Health and Safety Executive Reports

Additional evidence to support the severity and impact of the injury, including treatment records, expert testimony in the court and associated expenses.

Exemptions Motorcyclists, cyclists, riders (driver or passenger), wheelchair users, mobility scooter users, and pedestrians are not included in the tariff system. Exemptions for accidents occurring outside the scope of the Whiplash Reforms Act 2021, i.e., road traffic accidents involving uninsured or untraceable drivers.
Compensation Awards Fixed compensation amounts are awarded based on the severity of the injury and the duration of symptoms through the Official Injury Claim Portal.

  • Mild injuries with full recovery within 3 months – £1,000
  • Moderate injuries with recovery within 3 to 24 months – £2,000
  • Severe injuries with recovery between 2 and 5 years – £3,725
These injuries require careful assessments and negotiation based on the individual circumstances and impact of the injury; hence, the court determines the compensation amounts.

  • The severity of your injuries (e.g., lifelong or partial disabilities)
  • Impact of injuries on your life (e.g., loss of future earning capacity)
  • The cost of any treatment (e.g., rehabilitation or therapy)
Legal Aid Claimants can use legal advice to understand the process and initiate their claims through the Official Injury Claim Portal in the UK. In non-tariff injury compensation cases, legal assistance is mandatory. Legal representatives help gather evidence, assess the injury’s impact and ensure fair compensation.

Compensation for Psychological Injuries

If you are struggling with anxiety and depression after being involved in a road traffic accident that was not your fault – you no longer have to suffer! You can claim compensation for the following two categories as defined by the Judicial College Guidelines:

  • General psychiatric damages include but are not limited to depression, stress, anxiety, pre-travel/ travel anxiety, distress, embarrassment, panic attacks and personality disorders.

  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) occurs when the victim develops psychological trauma after a traumatic event. Its symptoms include hyperarousal, flashbacks and intrusive thoughts.

Claim the Maximum Compensation

Start your claim today and get closer to the compensation you deserve. Once you contact us, our psychology experts will establish the following to strengthen your case for getting the maximum compensation in the UK:

  • Determine eligibility and gather evidence.

  • Establish the causation of your injury

  • Connection of your injury with your accident

  • Determine eligibility and gather evidence.

  • The impact of injury on the quality of your life

  • The prognosis and future consequences

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Frequently Asked Questions

Tariff injuries refer to whiplash injuries that fall within the predefined compensation tariff set by the Whiplash Reforms Act 2021. Non-tariff injuries, on the other hand, are injuries that do not fit within the predefined tariff range and require further physical and/ or psychological assessment to understand the severity and impact of the injury to ensure fair compensation.

Motorcyclists, cyclists, wheelchair/ mobility scooter users and pedestrians are exempted from the tariff system. Additionally, exemptions may be granted in specific circumstances, such as accidents involving uninsured or untraced drivers or accidents occurring outside the scope of the Whiplash Reforms Act.

If you are unsure whether your injury falls under the category of tariff or non-tariff, we recommend you contact us. Alternatively, you can also schedule a call back via (01282) 786 185 or drop an email at info@concisemedico.co.uk today!

Our experts will assess the details of your injury, review the specific circumstances of the incident/ accident, and provide guidance based on their expertise and knowledge of the Whiplash Reforms Act.

Seeking legal assistance and representation is especially recommended for non-tariff injuries, as these injuries rely on further medical and psychological assessments and expert reports for negotiating fair compensation.

However, for tariff injuries, legal professionals will only advise and guide claimants through the process of claiming compensation via the Official Injury Portal in the UK.

As part of our initial consultation, we’ll review any proof and evidence you’ve managed to obtain so far. Our personal injury experts in the UK will help you with the following right away:

  • Determine your eligibility
  • Gather the required evidence
  • Provide legal representation

So, feel free to contact us at any time. You can also schedule a call back via (01282) 786 185 or drop an email at info@concisemedico.co.uk today!